FDSA Training Camp 2019

Amy Cook, PhD.

Amy’s Bio and Sessions

about  Amy Cook

Amy Cook, Ph.D. has been training dogs for over 25 years, and through Full Circle Dog Training and Play Way Dogs in Oakland, CA, has been specializing in the rehabilitation of shy and fearful dogs for almost 20 years. She is a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant through the IAABC, a longstanding professional member of the APDT, and was one of the first trainers nationally to become a Certified Professional Dog Trainer through independent evaluation. She is a graduate of the SFSPCA academy for dog trainers and has attended all 4 “chicken camps” in Hot Springs, Arkansas, taught by Bob Bailey. Amy also owns the “shy-k9s” list on yahoo, a 4000-member group dedicated to the rehabilitation of fearful dogs, and has moderated there since 2001.

Amy has worked for the Berkeley-East Bay Humane Society, the San Francisco Animal Care and Control, and has provided behavioral evaluations for shelters and rescues throughout the Bay Area of California. She currently works with the Anti-Cruelty team at the ASPCA doing behavioral evaluations and psychological enrichment of the dogs seized in dog fighting, puppy mill, and hoarding cases.

Amy returned to school in 2006 to get her PhD in Psychology from UC Berkeley. Her research focused on the dog-human relationship and its effect on the problem solving strategies dogs employ. She has also studied causal inference in dogs and toddlers with Anna Waismeyer and Alison Gopnik, and currently works with Lucia Jacobs on dog olfaction. She has extensive experience as a graduate student instructor, having taught sections of Introductory Psychology (both in person and online), Human Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, Stigma and Prejudice, Statistics, Animal Cognition, and has taught Fundamentals of Psychology and Developmental Psychology as a full instructor.

Her dogs have trained, participated, and titled in Rally, Competition Obedience, Agility, Flyball, Nosework and Barn Hunt — and her young whippet loves agility best!

2019  camp sessions

Day 1: Friday

11:00AM – 12:30PM ET

Hall D

Dealing with Judge Pressure! Lab

Experience Level: All 

You’ve trained hard, have your heeling all set, your dog is engaged… uh oh. Where’d that judge come from? Why is he following us? Lots of dogs are proximity sensitive and aren’t comfortable with being directly approached, followed, or crowded by strangers (especially strangers with clipboards and hats!). Some dogs want to rush to greet anyone within a 10-foot radius! In this class, we’ll go over things you can do to help your dog be comfortable with these “strange” judge behaviors and not feel the need to keep an eye on them. We’ll also help those greeters learn that judges are boring, and you are the best!

Day 1: Friday

4:00PM – 6:00PM ET

Hall D

From Startle to Recovery Lab

Experience Level: All

You’re carrying on as usual at a trial or on a walk and then something surprising happens that scares your dog! A table crashes! A door slams! What do you do? Helping your dog shake it off and return to normal requires laying a recovery foundation ahead of time! In this lab you’ll install a recovery sequence start to finish, by backchaining each element until you have the whole thing assembled. Give your dog some recovery language!

Day 2: Saturday

11:00AM – 12:40PM ET

Lecture Room

Reactivity Management – LECTURE ONLY (No Working Teams)

Every great training plan has a management plan behind it! You don’t have the space to train if you’re still not sure how to get through your daily life and walk your dog without “over threshold” moments! Before you can teach your dog that strange dogs or people are not scary, you first need to get past them with your dog under control and not getting a big jolt of arousal. Come join Amy and learn how management is different from training or rehab, and why it needs daily practice whether your dog is “over threshold” or not!

Day 2: Saturday

4:00PM – 6:00PM ET

Hall E

The Play Way: Playing without Toys Lab

Experience Level: All

Play is your best stress reliever! Have you ever thought about what play would look like if you didn’t have a toy to play with? Have you ever thought about playing with your food instead of handing it over? Play, especially play that doesn’t involve toys, is often something we don’t explore with our dogs, but it’s really a useful skill for making your dog feel better! Developing a good personal play relationship with your dog will allow you to play anywhere and reduce your dog’s stress levels. Playing with food raises its value and introduces dogs unfamiliar with play to the idea. Come play with us!

Day 3: Sunday

9:00AM – 10:40AM ET

Lecture Room

What is Your Dog Telling You? Understanding Your Dog’s Emotional Signals – LECTURE ONLY (No Working Teams)

Is your dog ready to work? Is your dog comfortable in the environment and able to think clearly? Your dog’s comfort needs have to be met first before he can work. Do you know how he’s communicating those needs with you? Signs of stress and discomfort are subtle early on. Come learn how to read your dog in new ways!

Day 3: Sunday

3:50PM – 5:30PM ET

Hall B

Connected Transitions Lab

Experience Level: All

Moving from exercise to exercise in the ring without deflating your dog’s energy and losing connection or ricocheting them up into the stratosphere can be a real challenge! This is your time to stay connected and move together while keeping your dog ready to work. Don’t know what your dog needs? Come learn your options!